Tag Archives: Music Internships

Using Media to Get Noticed

International student Sunguk Cho recently produced an introductory video marketing himself to internship employers

Thoughts on Sunguk Cho’s Introductory Video
Joe Burke, Office Manager, Office of Experiential Learning

It’s no secret that the music industry is restructuring. But with the added pressure of a global economy still recovering from a recession- one quickly understands that interns and recent grads are entering a very challenging job market. Videos like Sunguk’s are a great example of how ambitious students are getting recognized among employers. As a public relations professional in a former life, I liked Sunguk’s video for several reasons: Continue reading

Julia Lee: Final Thoughts

In her last post of our 3-part series, we asked Korean Student Julia Lee if she felt there was a significant difference between US and Korean workplaces

I had an internship in Korea at a Korean Broadcasting Network. That is only official work experience that I have, but in my experience, I don’t think there is much difference between Korean and American workplaces. Everything is pretty much the same. I mean there is definitely a cultural difference, but those things seem to me so minor I don’t even think of them as a difference.

Because I am a Korean and I have mostly a Korean background, that gives me little bit of disadvantage overall in the United States. But because I have Korean background, I can work faster! Most Koreans are used to working fast. Many of my American coworkers are surprised by me working fast- and also they appreciate it. Continue reading

Julia Lee: New Environments, New Skills

Introduced in her previous blog post, we asked Korean student Julia Lee what each of her internship sites were like and how the experiences helped her develop music business skills

I had my first real music industry experience with Mach Speed Music, which is a small artist management company running a children’s music program. I did the internship during the summer of 2009. This company has two artists and the good thing about this internship site was that because they were a small and young company, I got to help with many different things; copyright registration, ASCAP registration to CDbaby and Pandora uploads. I got to do a lot of different things that I had heard of from class or friends.

There were some difficulty and confusion as I did the work, but the internship coordinator helped me a lot and we worked through it together. Even though I was only interning at one company, I felt like I was interning at two because I would help with children’s music classes aside from my music management role. Continue reading

Julia Lee: International Intern

South Korean intern Julia Lee gives us a brief introduction to herself and the reason she chose to study at Berklee. In the next two posts, she shares her thoughts about what interning has been like for an international student.

I decided to study in U.S when I was sixteen years old. The reason why I chose to study in the States is I got to be an exchange student for a year. Before I came here, I had no idea how schools are in U.S. except from scenes about high school life in movies that I saw. However, I knew little bit of English before I came.

I want to ask you a question: Would you believe that a high school student has to stay at school until 12AM? You would first ask “Why? For what?” (those are two common reactions from friends I’ve asked). And I would answer, “To study”.
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Cross-cultural Workplaces in Germany

Christopher Kirsch, intern at Sony Classical, Germany, describes the differences between German and American workplaces and how cross-cultural workplaces share strengths from both sides of the pond

Working in the media branch in Germany can be pretty much the same as in the US. Of course, the music market is much smaller, since Germany has only 82 million inhabitants. Nevertheless, it is still a prolific industry, making it the third biggest music market worldwide. It is not only that Europe and America are mentally tied to each other. Moreover, it is America’s cultural impact that has been dominated the business world in Germany and Continental Europe in recent years.

Having lived so long in the US, it was also interesting for me to experience similarities and differences between here and overseas. In Germany, for instance, it is not very common to call your colleagues by their first name – especially, if their position is higher than yours. You would rather say Mr. or Ms. At Sony though we would go by our first names, just like in English speaking countries. Generally, the English language has become an unavoidable tool in business language. Words like “schedule”, “meeting”, or “forecast” have substituted the appropriate German description.
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