Category Archives: Valencia Campus

Music Business Seminar – Leo Nascimento: Brazil Music Market Ambassador

Students Aimee Jagou and Gabrielle Mella from the global entertainment and music business master’s program reflect upon the twelfth of the Music Business Seminars, where they had the chance to to learn more about the Brazilian music industry with guest speaker Leo Nascimento.

Leo-Nascimento-Berklee-ValenciaLeo-Nascimento-Berklee-Valencia-2

 

Last week we had Leo Nascimento as our guest in the music business seminar, currently director of Deezer in Spain, he’s been in the digital music industry in Latin America and Europe for quite a while. He has work in companies like Universal Music Group, Reader’s Digest, Volkswagen and other influential companies. With an opening to Samba music by great Berklee musicians from Brazil, we humbly received this incredible speaker to introduce us to the Brazil music market.

The thing we liked the most about Leo Nascimiento’s presentation about the Brazilian market was the fact that he actually took the time to introduce us to Brazil’s economic and social aspect, which plays an important role in the music industry. Brazil is one of the most important countries in Latin America and it is ranked as the seventh largest economy in the world. Clearly, the country is an emerging market and will continue to become one of the most important market in the world. Brazil most important cities and where the most activities are concentrated are between Brasilia, Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo. Obviously, the most important and political capital is Brasilia, but the most important in terms of economy is Sao Paulo. Besides of Brazil’s economy and political factors, there are other things that play a very important role in the country, like football, religion, carnival, soap operas and lastly music.

Brazil’s music market is ranked number 9 in the world. Local artists represent 70% of the music market in Brazil. Artists like Paula Fernandes, Luan Santana, Michel Telo, Padre Fabio de Melo are very influential in Brazil music market. International artists that are big in Brazil are Beyonce, Shakira, Pitbull, Imagine Dragons, among others representing 40% of the market. Brazilian music genres are diverse and vary according to region. Genres like Sertanejo, Samba, Gospel and Funk are among the most important. Since the country is one of the most catholic country in Latin America, Gospel music being one of the most influent.

Physical music still plays a very important role on the music industry, but with the growth of internet, digital is becoming very prominent as well. With the growth of internet users and the ever growing of mobile usage, digital promises to become standard this year in Brazil music market.

The development of the Brazilian digital market is opening doors to artists worldwide who wish to enter the market. Though, Sertanejo is still the most popular music in the country, the Internet has made people aware of the international music. On Youtube, Sertanejo and international pop music are both the most listened genres. Digital users are more open to international music.

Another comment Leo stressed is the huge live music income that Brazil generates. There are tremendous key partners, sponsors and venues offered in Brazil. However, Leo listed some important tips to work in Brazil. Among those, he suggested to get a partner in Brazil who will know about the legislative aspects, the culture and the market. Also, he warned us about getting a sponsor, it can be profitable but also, can require a lot of conditions. Finally, he advised us to invest in Facebook and YouTube as promoting channels.

During his lecture, Leo emphasized the development of the music industry in Brazil. Two technological factors can partly explain this development. First, the increase of Internet users: they represent 108 millions in Brazil, which is the 5th biggest audience worldwide.However, currently only 53% of the population has access to the Internet, which is a significant sign for upcoming opportunities.

Second factor is the Brazilians appetite for Android mobiles. Leo talked about a “leapfrogging trend”. Every Brazilians are getting an Android to use it to access the diverse social media platforms and, for sure, to listen to music.

Actually the most used platform is Youtube, with 62 Millions users in Brazil (#5 in global ranking).There is also a legal factor to mention to explain the fast digital growth of the music market in Brazil. Actually, thanks to the entrance of legal free music services like Spotify and Deezer, the Internet piracy reduced (by 31% in 2014). Therefore, as in most of the countries worldwide, Brazil is experiencing a fast digital growth and, digital sales were almost bypassing physical sales in 2014. Brazil was ranked in 2013 the #11 in global revenues from the digital market.

In conclusion, thanks to Leo, we got a full overview of the Brazilian music market and its opportunities, mainly present in the digital market and live entertainment.

Tudo Bem!

My Reconciliation with World Music at Womex

Julia Hoffman is a global entertainment and music business graduate program student at Berklee’s Valencia campus. In this post she reflects on the Womex conference she attended in Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Julia Womex

In October I learned what it means to be a ‘Womexican.’ Womex takes place for five days every October in a different city throughout Europe and it is not to be missed by any artist manager, agent, label, or festival programmer in the world music scene. And this really is a ‘scene.’ At this year’s Womex in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, I realized that anyone who is anyone seemed to know everyone! It is a close-knit community and having an ‘in’ can lead to many opportunities. Some notable encounters of mine included meeting Bruno Boulay, Programmer of MIDEM, Todd Puckhaber, programmer for the SouthxSouthwest Festival, and Malcolm Haynes, programmer for Glastonbury.

As a newcomer to Womex, I found myself thinking a lot about World Music. My distaste for the term spurs from the ever-so-common western view of ‘us’ versus ‘them.’ Michal Shapiro, music journalist for the Huffington Post and long-time proponent of World Music, gave me a quick history of the phrase explaining that it was “created at a time when the marketing of this kind of music was very difficult because there were record stores with bins that didn’t have the right classification…the way that this whole thing came about (it’s kind of legendary) is that a whole bunch of these pioneers got together in a pub in Islington and struggled for three days or something (it sounds biblical) but they came up with this term ‘World Music’ just to try to market it.”

So, World Music started as a genre invented by the hippy generation in Western Europe and North America to account for all genres of music in all languages other than English in order to market it? That means it can include everything from ‘tribal’ music recorded in the Amazon rain forest to professionally produced rock music from Sweden. Needless to say the term has its critics, including

David Byrne who argues in his New York Times article I Hate World Music, “The term is a catch-all that commonly refers to non-western music of any and all sorts, popular music, traditional music and even classical music…one in which all music is equal, regardless of sales and slickness of production, this a musical utopia.”

Other opponents contend that this narrow categorization prevents music from reaching other consumers outside of the World Music scene. At an A&R workshop at Berklee Valencia, Entertainment Lawyer and professor at London Metropolitan University, Pete Dyson claimed, “Once labeled as a World Music artist, there is no return.“

However, if my experience at Womex was any indication, it appears that World Music is now growing as networks shrink with globalization and the internet makes the need to categorize music into genres almost obsolete…and the youngsters want a piece of the action.

Allie Silver, 27-year old founder of Free Radical Productions, an artist management and consulting business based in Buenos Aires, explained that in her six consecutive years at Womex, she has seen the number of young attendees skyrocket. “I used to be one of a handful of young people at the conference,” Silver said, “and now we make up what feels like half.”

Shapiro with the Huffington Post added to this by saying,“…the internet has made [young] people more open rather than less open, and right now I think people have less of a sense of judgment of music as fashion, but as ‘Is it cool?’ ‘Do I like it?’ So it’s really more a matter of making it more accessible in any channels that work.”

Shapiro explains that World Music has grown significantly over the years because it is flexible. She claims that initially it was run by ‘purists,’ [but] “it no longer is and fortunately most of those people who we thought to be ‘purists’ were more flexible and felt that it was important to be able to expand the definition of what World Music is…I think at this point they are willing to say it’s not just world music, it is just great music.” The vibrancy and networking opportunities at Womex are attracting audiences from all cultures, ages and genres. As Womex expands to include more young people and music of such a vast variety, while genres blur with the rise of the Internet, I ask myself, will the term World Music become obsolete?

Queade’s Valencia Videoblog 2

Queade
Queade Dweh (Vocalist)
8th Semester, Music Business Marketing
Philadelphia,PA/New Jersey

Originally from Philadelphia, Pa, Queade Dweh (vocalist and pianist) is a performer and aspiring business-woman ready to begin her career in the music industry. During her junior year in undergrad, she decided to spend her last semester in Spain to explore international learning opportunities. As her graduation approaches from Berklee College of Music, she hopes to use her knowledge gained majoring in Music Business to help others.

Hi Bloggers!

My name is Queade Dweh, and I’m so excited to show you all my experiences in Spain. Valencia has so many positive things to offer students and I hope through my blog you all will take a moment to at least think about coming here for a semester. Each week I will post about different topics from traveling and booking tickets to how to get around in Valencia/Europe. Talk to you soon!!

-Q

Queade’s Valencia Videoblog

Queade
Queade Dweh (Vocalist)
8th Semester, Music Business Marketing
Philadelphia,PA/New Jersey

Originally from Philadelphia, Pa, Queade Dweh (vocalist and pianist) is a performer and aspiring business-woman ready to begin her career in the music industry. During her junior year in undergrad, she decided to spend her last semester in Spain to explore international learning opportunities. As her graduation approaches from Berklee College of Music, she hopes to use her knowledge gained majoring in Music Business to help others.

Hi Bloggers!

My name is Queade Dweh, and I’m so excited to show you all my experiences in Spain. Valencia has so many positive things to offer students and I hope through my blog you all will take a moment to at least think about coming here for a semester. Each week I will post about different topics from traveling and booking tickets to how to get around in Valencia/Europe. Talk to you soon!!

-Q

Music Business Seminar – Why do Music Stores Have Mirrors? (And Other Musings of Music and the Market)

Students Megan Himel and Louis Pratt from the global entertainment and music business master’s program reflect upon the eleventh of the Music Business Seminars, where they had the chance to listen to George Howard talk about his experience in the music industry.

George Howard1

During the week of February 6th, 2015, the students at Berklee Valencia were honored to host George Howard, a seasoned music industry veteran, as a guest lecturer. George found remarkable success over the years, running record labels (Rykodisc, Essex River Work and Slow River Records) as well as co-­‐founding TuneCore and other respected names in the music industry. With his latest venture, George Howard Advising, George hopes to draw on his years of experience in the industry (and running previous advisement firms) in order to help artists and brands fulfill their potential to work smarter, not harder.

George is also widely regarded as one of the most popular teachers on Berklee’s Boston campus. After speaking in front of Berklee Valencia’s GEMB class, the students unanimously understood why that was the case. It was obvious how passionate George was, not just about the industry, but also about the students studying it. It is one thing to claim your students inspire you in your professional bio, but George wore his feelings on his sleeve. His humbleness, even after years of success, resonated with the audience. His drive to highlight the fact that educators can learn just as much from students as the reciprocal situation, helped tune students into the conversation at hand. We love to see music industry pro’s investing in students’ futures -­‐ both personal and professional: it won’t be long before these students are disrupting the industry they love (in good ways, of course.) George articulated his purpose loud and clear, which made his speech about the topic just that much more special.

George Howard2

When talking about creating value in a company, George discussed the (wh)Y, as in “it’s like X, but with Y.” This is what we call the competitive advantage. A competitive advantage can take many forms: price, or any number of unique services or features. Latching on to one of these can give your company a Key Market Wedge -­‐ something which allows you to ram into the market -­‐but runs the risk of being undercut (price) or mimicked (services and features): we are in a race towards homogenization. George expressed that the element which gives a company real grasp in a market circles back to the question: “Why do music stores have mirrors?”

The answer is simple: as consumers, we care about how the products we consume make us look -­‐ we want an external manifestation of our internal values. Therefore, when you build a company or a product, an important question is: for which value or desire does this product allow hope to manifest?

George expanded his dialogue on how to best run and market a company by discussing the Innovator’s Dilemma. This is a fascinating issue companies always struggle with: how much do you invest in the Cash Cow (the product currently servicing your customers and earning you money), and how much do you invest in the Shooting Star (the product that is not yet mainstream, but has the potential to be your next Cash Cow)? Many companies focus all their resources on the Cash Cow, neglecting the Shooting Star, therefore setting themselves up for a slow decline into obsolesce. With this in mind, we wonder what the Super Bowl half-­‐time show would look like if the parties involved decided to use the platform to break rising stars, rather than supporting the main act with aging cash cows of years past (cough, cough, Lenny Kravits). Don’t get us wrong, we LOVE Missy Elliot, but she hasn’t put out a record or been in the spotlight in 10 years! We would have loved to see an emerging act explode onto the scene and really benefit from Super Bowl sized platform and audience, instead of watching somebody who is already rich and famous…well, get more rich and famous.

George has been one of our favorite speakers to date. Along with sharing an amazing ethos and professional philosophy, he provided a mountain of practical experience to draw from. His words of encouragement were aptly timed and greatly appreciated.